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Archive for the ‘Business’ Category

Ray Hartley Finds Sinister Signs in Eskom’s Yearly Tariff Booklet

How to Fix South AfricaIn his latest column for the Business Times, Ray Hartley examines the changes to Eskom’s “tariffs and charges” booklet since the infamous “rolling blackouts” of 2007.

According to Hartley, Eskom’s “hollow assurances” in the 2007 booklet indicate the utility “failed utterly” either to comprehend or anticipate South Africa’s energy emergency.

Hartley, editor of How to Fix South Africa, traces the price increases presented by Eskom each year – the 27.5% increase in 2008 and the even more dramatic 33.6% increase the following year – and points out the increasingly complex technical language used to explain away the new tariffs. He also suggests that the latest increase of 8% does not necessary point to a brighter future:

The latest tariffs and charges booklet is nostalgic. On its cover are the various corporate logos of Eskom over its 90 years.

The electricity supply situation has normalised to such an extent that a laughably small average increase of just 8% is announced.

There were no warnings of what was to come, no intimations that the grid was under stress, no suggestions … hang on. I’ve written those words before.

Book details

  • How to Fix South Africa: The country’s leading thinkers on what must be done to create jobs edited by Ray Hartley
    EAN: 9780620549882
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

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Podcast: Sam Motsuenyane Recalls How His Father’s Ambition Inspired Him

A Testament of HopeSam Motsuenyane talked to Ubuntu Radio about his book, A Testament of Hope: The Autobiography of Dr Sam Motsuenyane.

Motsuenyane, who is one of South Africa’s most esteemed business leaders, spoke to JP Louw about his humble beginnings on a farm in Potchefstroom, and recalled how his interest in business arose.

The seventh of eight children, Motsuenyane says it was his father’s indomitable ambition that inspired him to achieve greatness: “I was one of the last children of my father, and probably got more attention at that time from my parents, because most of [my siblings] were not as fortunate as I was to go to school to the same extent. I was lucky that my father, right when I started school, said: ‘I would like you one day to go America and study there.’ And I got inspired by the ambition that my father had for me before I even went to form one [standard seven].”

Listen to the full podcast:

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Video: Sam Motsuenyane Receives Luminary Award from the Free Market Foundation

A Testament of HopeSam Motsuenyane, entrepreneur, businessman and author of A Testament of Hope: The Autobiography of Dr Sam Motsuenyane, received a Luminary Award from the Free Market Foundation for his “outstanding individual enterprise excellence and leadership.”

At a ceremony held last month, Motsuenyane accepted the award and delivered a talk on the ways in which labour laws are failing South Africa. Watch his speech and read more about the award:

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South Africa, having achieved a democracy in 1994, is a country rich in potential with an unlimited future. The FMF wishes to identify those unique individuals who inspire others in a particular sphere of life. These individuals are elected as FMF Luminaries to memorialise their achievements as an example to all. Luminary Awards have been presented to Dr Yuri Maltsev, Archbishop Thabo Makgoba, Dr Pauline Dixon and Dr Sam Motsuenyane.

The central message from the Luminaries is that peaceful co-operation under the rule of law is the best way to achieve peace and prosperity for all.

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Video: Duma Gqubule Discusses the Nationalisation Debate in the Mining Industry

Making Mistakes Righting WrongsDuma Gqubule, BEE expert and author of Making Mistakes Righting Wrongs: Insights into Black Economic Empowerment, spoke to Fazila Farouk from the South African Civil Society Information Service about the debate over the nationalisation of the mining industry.

Gqubule says that it is important to remember “that the mineral resources under the ground do not belong to the companies that mine it, they belong to South African people” and that “because it is publicly owned, unlike a restaurant or a construction company or any other industry, it must generate additional returns for us as a country in addition to normal tax resources”.

Watch the interview or read the transcript below:

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Welcome to the South African Civil Society Information Service, I’m Fazila Farouk in Johannesburg.

The issue of nationalisation has surfaced again in mainstream debates in South Africa in the run-up to South Africa’s 2014 general elections.

Now much of that debate is being driven by the media’s reaction to Julius Malema’s new political party, the Economic Freedom Fighters. The Economic Freedom Fighters are calling for the nationalisation of South Africa’s mines and banks.

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Ray Hartley Questions Claims Made in President Jacob Zuma’s State of the Nation Address

How to Fix South AfricaRay Hartley says President Jacob Zuma’s claim, in his State of the Nation address, that “95% of households have access to water” is misleading.

Addressing the increase in service delivery protests, Zuma stated: “When 95% of households have access to water, the 5% who still need to be provided for feel that they cannot wait a moment longer.”

Hartley, editor of How to Fix South Africa, writes in Business Day that the statistics on South Africans’ access to water have already been thoroughly interrogated by Statistics South Africa and Africa Check, and found wanting.

According to the Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) General Household Survey published in 2011, ‘breaking that number down, 43.3% had piped water in their homes, 28.6% had access to water in their yards, 2.7% had the use of a neighbour’s tap, and 14.9% had to make use of communal taps.’

There was more. As Africa Check reported, things were getting worse when it came to water quality.

According to the same household survey, ‘only 62.1% of those surveyed rated the quality of water-related services as “good” compared to 76.3% in 2005.

“About 7.5% of the respondents believed their water was not safe to drink, 8% said their water was not clear, 8.9% said it tasted bad and 11.1% said their water was not free from bad smells.’

Book details

  • How to Fix South Africa: The country’s leading thinkers on what must be done to create jobs edited by Ray Hartley
    EAN: 9780620549882
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

» read article

Ray Hartley Discusses Africa Survey’s Dim View of South African Business Practice

How to Fix South AfricaRay Hartley reflects on Good Governance Africa’s recently released Africa Survey, which illustrates how difficult it is to do business in South Africa.

Hartley, the author of How to Fix South Africa, describes a report John Endres, CEO of Good Governance Africa, presented to an international audience on the state of Africa. The report suggests South Africa is falling behind Nigeria, Ghana, and even countries such as Zimbabwe and Rwanda, when it comes to business practice and economic growth.

Mr Endres has just released Good Governance Africa’s mammoth 421-page Africa Survey, which contains just about any statistical measurement of society, business and economics on the continent.

Instead of looking for African countries that tick all the boxes — there are precious few — Mr Endres says it is more useful to look at those who are improving their governance scores.

Or not. As in the case of South Africa, which has a deteriorating score. South Africa is viewed as a “young, but pretty much stable democracy”, though Mr Endres says: “I’m not so sure.”

Book details

  • How to Fix South Africa: The country’s leading thinkers on what must be done to create jobs edited by Ray Hartley
    EAN: 9780620549882
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

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Ray Hartley Analyses Which of the ANC’s ’94 Top 20 Still Support Jacob Zuma

How to Fix South AfricaIn an article for Times LIVE Ray Hartley, author of How to Fix South Africa, looks back at the ANC’s national election list of 1994, and evaluates who is still in support of President Jacob Zuma.

Nelson Mandela topped the list, with his preferred successor Cyril Ramaphosa second, and Thabo Mbeki third. In the 20 years since South Africa’s first democratic election, six of the original 20 have passed away. And since the Nkandla scandal, Hartley writes, Zuma has found friendship to be fleeting.

In the two decades since the list was released, much water has passed under the ANC’s bridge. Six of those in the top 20 – Mandela, Joe Slovo, Albertina Sisulu, Steve Tshwete, Dullah Omar and Chris Dlamini – have died.

Of the remaining 14, only four can be said to be “loyal” to President Jacob Zuma.

Book details

  • How to Fix South Africa: The country’s leading thinkers on what must be done to create jobs edited by Ray Hartley
    EAN: 9780620549882
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

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Ray Hartley: “South Africa May be Ignoring the Potential of a Stronger Relationship with Latin America”

How to Fix South Africa“In the rush to build relationships with rising industrial powers China and India, South Africa may be ignoring the potential of a stronger relationship with Latin America,” Ray Hartley writes in a column for Business Day.

Hartley discusses a recent think-tank, held by the Brenthurst Foundation, where former Nigerian president Olusegun Obasanjo, former Spanish prime minister Jose Maria Aznar and former Costa Rican president Miguel Angel Rodriguez discussed how the two continents could start working together.

In the rush to build relationships with rising industrial powers China and India, South Africa may be ignoring the potential of a stronger relationship with Latin America.

For one thing, many of the countries on the two continents share a similar historical trajectory: colonisation followed by fraught decades of independence during which coups and poor economic choices led to economic stagnation and greater poverty.

Book details

  • How to Fix South Africa: The country’s leading thinkers on what must be done to create jobs edited by Ray Hartley
    EAN: 9780620549882
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

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Podcast: Ray Hartley and Justice Malala Discuss Nelson Mandela’s Legacy and South Africa’s Current Situation

How to Fix South AfricaLet Them Eat CakeJustice Malala and Ray Hartley joined Stephen Grootes on Talk Radio 702 on Monday for a discussion on Nelson Mandela’s legacy and the country’s reaction to his death.

Hartley says that comparing South Africa after Mandela’s release to South Africa now shows a much more united country, although we still have big issues and big questions. Malala looks back to that time, saying that he hadn’t think things would look like they do today: “it’s an amazing country.” However, he emphasised that we still have to say: “I didn’t think we’d be here today, but could we be further?”

Listen to the podcasts:

Book details

  • How to Fix South Africa: The country’s leading thinkers on what must be done to create jobs edited by Ray Hartley
    EAN: 9780620549882
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

» read article

Ray Hartley Looks Back on the Adoption of South Africa’s Interim Constitution

How to Fix South AfricaIn a recent column for Business Day Ray Hartley, author of How to Fix South Africa, reflects on the period surrounding the adoption of South Africa’s interim constitution in 1993. He writes that “the history books have it that we were a rainbow nation”, but that this wasn’t entirely accurate:

It was exactly 20 years ago on Monday that negotiators signed off on South Africa’s “interim” constitution, a document that would guide the transition from apartheid to democracy. The history books have it that we were a rainbow nation, our faces turned from a past of division towards a new dawn. The history books are not entirely accurate.

Book details

  • How to Fix South Africa: The country’s leading thinkers on what must be done to create jobs edited by Ray Hartley
    EAN: 9780620549882
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

» read article